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Nepal

Welcome to the Kingdom of Nepal. Nepal is an ancient land of snow-covered peaks and amazing people. Twenty-eight distinct ranges of the Himalayan mountain chain traverse this tiny nation nestled between India and (Tibet) China. Nepal boasts eight of the world's ten highest summits, including Mt. Everest (8,850 m).

Team's Vision

To see God glorified in Nepal through holistic ministry, strategic partnerships, and personal witness—culminating in evangelistic/church planting movements among the unreached. As we work towards this vision, we strongly value learning local language and culture, ministering in teams, exhibiting Christian values, working with like-minded organizations, capacity building, and working in creative-access platforms.

Watch a video about opportunities in Nepal and other countries in Central and Southeast Asia or watch the full-length version

Country & Ministry Profile

Nepal, previously the world’s only Hindu kingdom, is home to many diverse cultural groups including Muslims, Buddhists, and animists. Renowned as home of the towering Himalayas, it has two other distinct regions: a foothills region marked by swiftly flowing rivers, and a flat, fertile area in the south. It is bordered by India on three sides and by China to the north. Nepal is one of the poorest and least developed countries, opening the door to great physical and spiritual opportunity. Fewer than half of the adults are literate, and nearly half live below the poverty line. Child mortality is as high as 60% in some regions.

Nepal moved to multi-party democracy in 1991, changing from an absolute to constitutional monarchy. Maoist rebels have sparked political unrest and violence across the country since 1996, and this, along with the massacre of the royal family in 2001 has led to the eventual retreat of the monarchy. Nepal is no longer an officially Hindu kingdom. Nepal is making slow progress towards constitutional government; the communists currently hold the major power block. However the violence unleashed for the last 10 years has made it difficult to move quickly to peace.

Prior to 1990, believers were routinely imprisoned for having converted or for evangelizing. Official persecution ended with the change in government, but pressure and restrictions continue in many areas, especially where the church is enjoying rapid growth. Churches are increasingly responding to our Lord’s commission and taking the Gospel to unreached groups. In fact Nepali people, both inside and outside of Nepal, have declared: “Nepali people—Missionary people!”

SIM works in Nepal in partnership with a mission involved in medical and development work called International Nepal Fellowship (INF). We also are seeking new creative platforms including teaching, learning, and business. Our aim is to partner with the church that the Lord has planted in discipleship and mission.

Nepal is part of the C-SEA (Central & Southeast Asia) Area.

Scripture Availability

The translation of the Bible into Nepali was completed in 1915. Besides Nepali, the New Testament is now available in 6 languages, and the New Testament is available in 11 more. Christian literature can now be freely printed and distributed without censorship. Christian broadcasts are little known, but the JESUS film is being widely used.

History of Christianity

Churches indigenous to India worked in Nepal prior to any mission endeavors from Europe. Baptist missionary William Carey produced the Nepali New Testament in 1821. The Church of Scotland established a strong base among the Nepalis and Lepchas at Darjeeling in 1835. Over the next century, Darjeeling played a vital role in facilitating the birth and growth of the church in Nepal, Bhutan, and Assam. The first recorded Nepalis who began to follow Christ were some Kathmandu merchants in Lhasa, Tibet.

When Gurkhas, world-renowned Nepali soldiers, served in the British army in Malaysia, Singapore, and elsewhere, many became Christians, and on their return to Nepal, moved back to remote areas. The church owes much of its origin to a Nepalese army officer, Prem Pradhan, who converted to Christianity in India and returned to Nepal in 1959. His evangelistic activity led to conversions and eight baptisms. Because this was illegal, both he and the converts were imprisoned for nearly five years. More conversions took place through Pradhan while he was in prison, and he continued to share the love and forgiveness of Jesus after his release.

Nepal is part of the Roman Catholic diocese of Patna in India. There were no Catholic parish priests or sisters, but 15 American Jesuit priests came in 1951 at the government's invitation to open a school.

Prior to 1990, believers were routinely imprisoned for having converted or for evangelizing. Official persecution ended with the change in government, but pressure and restrictions continue in many areas, especially where the church is enjoying rapid growth. Churches are increasingly responding to our Lord's commission and taking the Gospel to unreached groups. It is still illegal to proselytize, and in some areas churches also face persecution from the Maoists.

Freedom has opened the doors to a variety of sects and denominations, and Christian literature can now be freely printed and distributed without censorship. Christian broadcasts are little known, but the JESUS film is being widely used.

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